New video gives closer look at repeat Franklin shoplifters

New, better video is being released of two suspects wanted in a series of shoplifting cases from the CoolSprings Galleria. The two arrived in this dark colored SUV, on March 20 and March 23, and stole designer sunglasses & fragrances. There is a cash reward if you know who they are.

Previously released video

Recognize them?
Call Crime Stoppers:
(615) 794-4000
or click to submit an anonymous eTip
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Crime Stoppers cash offered for ID of repeat shoplifters

Franklin Police are trying to identify two suspects wanted in a series of shoplifting cases from the CoolSprings Galleria. The two arrived in this dark colored SUV, on March 20 and March 23, and stole designer sunglasses & fragrances. There is a cash reward if you know who they are.

Recognize them?
Call Crime Stoppers:
(615) 794-4000
or click to submit an anonymous eTip
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Tips on avoiding tax season scams, from our friends at Age Well Middle Tennessee

 

As a new tax season ramps up, keep in mind that scammers will be ramping up their efforts to steal YOUR money. The scams come in different forms: phishing emails, harassing phone calls, and tax return identity theft.

Here are some steps to help keep your identity and money safe:

  • File taxes early to avoid scammers
  • Be cautious about tax-related emails. Do not use links within the email.  Instead, go to the IRS website for relevant information
  • Hang up on IRS impersonator phone calls
  • Report suspicious emails or phone calls ASAP
  • Shred bank and tax documents before throwing them away
  • Update your computer security software

The IRS offers an option called Identity Protection PIN (IP PIN) that assigns a unique six-digit code to eligible taxpayers that helps limit fraudulent tax returns. There is more information available at www.irs.gov/identity-theft-fraud-scams/get-an-identity-protection-pin.

Here are some reminders about the IRS. They will NEVER:

  • call about past taxes without having mailed several notices first
  • call to demand payment with threats to involve law enforcement and have you arrested
  • call or email asking you to divulge personal and/or financial information
  • require payment without allowing you to appeal or even question the amount due
  • require you to use a specific payment method like a pre-paid debit card
  • ask for your credit/debit card and/or bank information over the phone

If you receive any IRS-related scam communication, please report to Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA) at www.treasury.gov/tigta/ and to the IRS at phishing@irs.gov.

(Information courtesy Council on Aging)

Video: Aggressive motorcycle driver wanted after road rage turns physical

Franklin Police and Crime Stoppers are offering a cash reward for information on who this angry driver is.

In this video, you see him punch and shatter the driver’s side mirror of another motorist, following a verbal traffic altercation. It happened on Murfreesboro Road near I-65. The white male driver of this blue sport bike, with an extended swingarm, possibly had an Australian accent. Call Crime Stoppers if you know who he is.

Crime Stoppers:
(615) 794-4000
or click to submit an anonymous eTip
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Tips on avoiding tech support schemes, from our friends at Age Well Middle Tennessee

According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3), tech support schemes are on the rise and 66% of all reports from 2020 were from older adults 60+. In this instance, criminals may pose as a company’s representatives offering to help with issues regarding your bank account, email, or computer software.

The FBI reports that the first contact can occur in many different ways.

  • Telephone: You receive an unsolicited telephone call from a criminal impersonating computer support, bank representatives/support, and utility companies.
  • Search Engine Advertising: Don’t search online to find support numbers, visit the company’s direct website. Criminals pay to have their fraudulent company’s link show higher in search results hoping victims will choose one of the top links in search results.
  • Pop-up message: When an on-screen pop-up message claiming a virus was found on their computer. The message requests the victim call a phone number associated with the fraudulent tech support company.
  • Email: You receive an email warning of support subscription expiration or a potentially fraudulent charge on their account. The victim is encouraged to contact the fraudulent support via phone.

Tips to Protect Against Tech Support

  • Legitimate customer, security, or tech support companies will not initiate unsolicited contact with individuals; nor, demand immediate payment, or require payment via prepaid cards, wire transfers, or mailed cash.
  • Install ad-blocking software that eliminates or reduces pop-ups and mal-vertising, which are online ads that incorporate or install malware. Ensure all computer anti-virus, security, and malware protection is up to date.
  • Be cautious of customer support numbers obtained via open-source searching. Phone numbers listed in a “sponsored” results section might be boosted because of Search Engine Advertising.
  • Resist the pressure to act quickly. Criminals will urge the victim to act fast to protect their device. Legitimate companies will allow time for a person to process and research any questions.
  • Never give unknown, unverified persons remote access to devices or accounts.

(Information courtesy Council on Aging)

Holiday scam prevention tips, from our friends at Age Well Middle Tennessee

(Courtesy Age Well Middle Tennessee)

While we shop and cook and hang holiday lights, scammers are busy looking for their next targets. The Better Business Bureau has issued a list of scams to be on the lookout for during the holiday season and tips on how to keep yourself from being the next victim.

  1. Online Shopping: Most stores have switched to chip reading credit card machines to reduce the risk of fraud and skimming. However, scammers are now focusing their efforts online. To protect yourself and your money, financial experts recommend using a credit card instead of a debit card when making online purchases.
  2. Lookalike Websites: It’s very easy for scammers to mimic real websites.  Look for the HTTPS and lock symbol at the top of the webpage; the “s” stands for secure. Also, look at the spelling of the web address. It is extremely easy for tricksters to change or add an extra letter to make it look legitimate.
  3. Fake Shipping Notifications: This scam is used with different techniques. You may receive an email with attachments or links that could download malware to your computer to steal your personal information. You could also receive a nondescript postcard where you are instructed to call the number on the card which could lead to you revealing private information and/or when the house is vacant. Don’t fall for it!
  4. Phony Charities: Scammers like to take advantage of the holiday spirit by using fake charity solicitations in your email, by phone, and on social media sites. You can verify charities at www.give.orgor https://givingmatters.civicore.com/.
  5. Temporary Holiday Jobs: A lot of companies need additional help during the holidays. Steer clear of job postings that ask you to share personal information or pay for job leads.
  6. Emergency Scams: Be extremely skeptical if you receive a call from a “relative” saying they have been arrested, kidnapped, or hospitalized while traveling. Never send money unless you can verify the information with another family member first.
  7. Letters from Santa: There are several reputable companies that offer personalized letters from Santa Claus; however, scammers like to use this as a way to obtain personal and financial information from parents and grandparents.
  8. Unusual Forms of Payment: Be wary of anyone asking for prepaid debit cards, gift cards, wire transfers, etc. as a form of payment. These transactions cannot be traced or refunded.
  9. Travel Scams: Use caution when searching for travel bargains. Remember, if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.
  10. Social Media Gift Exchange: It sounds fun to purchase one gift and receive so much more in return; however, this holiday “fun” is actually a pyramid scheme, which is illegal.
  11. Gift Card Scams: Gift cards are always a great idea for the holidays. Just remember to be vigilant. Avoid gift cards displayed in the open. If you choose one that is in a package, inspect the package or open it in front of the cashier to ensure it has not been replaced with a phony. Keep your receipt and register the card online with a new PIN (if possible).
  12. Online Pet Shopping: During the holidays a lot of people look for the perfect gift which could be a pet. Be skeptical of online pet sales. You might receive a pet from a “puppy mill” which could increase the likelihood of poor health, or you may receive nothing at all.

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Caught in the act: Franklin Police arrest 2, recover 26 stolen catalytic converters

Police in Franklin have stopped two catalytic converter thieves in their tracks.

Officers interrupted an in-progress theft last week in the CoolSprings Galleria parking lot. Laquetta Eugene, 44, of Houston, TX, and 32-year-old Chesare Rivers of Memphis were arrested on September 30. Officers spotted Rivers under a car with an electric saw, and moved in. After they did, they discovered 26 catalytic converters in the car Eugene was driving. All of them appear to have been cut off of victim’s vehicles, and detectives are hoping to identify some of those victims.

Cars missing a catalytic converter will have a loud roaring sound, especially when accelerating. Criminals who steal catalytic converters are hoping to cash in on up to $800 on the black market. The high value is due to precious metals like platinum and rhodium that are used to make them.

If your catalytic converter was stolen in the past couple of weeks, Franklin Police want to hear from you. Victims can contact Franklin PD Criminal Investigations at (615) 791-3237.

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Crime Stoppers cash offered for ID of thief who stole thousands in fragrances

 

Franklin Police are hoping someone from the community might recognize this suspect. On September 10, he stole nearly $2,000 in fragrances from the CoolSprings Galleria Ulta. The suspect left in a waiting black sedan, possibly a Toyota Corolla.

There is a cash reward for information

Call Crime Stoppers:
(615) 794-4000
or click to submit an anonymous eTip
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URGENT: Franklin / Williamson County Communication Outage

The widespread Nashville area communications outage has impacted most of Williamson County 9-1-1 lines and many of the non-emergency numbers used to reach public safety organizations throughout the county.

For police, fire, or medical assistance call: (615) 790-5550 

AT&T customers and others experiencing a cellular outage may be able to utilize their mobile phone to place calls and to send and receive text messages while connected to WiFi. To activate WiFi calling, follow the instructions below:

 iPhone Users:

  1. Be sure you are connected to a working WiFi network
  2. Go to settings and click “Cellular”
  3. Click on “Wi-Fi Calling”
  4. Slide “Wi-Fi Calling on This iPhone” to ON
  5. Click “Enable” Wi-Fi Calling
  6. Follow the prompts to enter your home address and then click “Verify address. or confirm”

Android Users:

  1. Pull down the notification shade and long-press the Wi-Fi icon to enter Wi-Fi settings.
  2. Scroll to the bottom and select “Wi-Fi Preferences”.
  3. Tap “Advanced”.
  4. Select Wi-Fi Calling and flip the switch to “On”.

If you have a monitored burglar, fire, or medical alarm – your alarm may not currently notify emergency responders. The only reliable way to currently request police, fire, or medical assistance in most of Williamson County is by calling: (615) 790-5550.

For updates, visit https://tn-williamsoncountyops.civicplus.com/340/Williamson-County-Communications-Outage

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