Two arrested after firing water pellet gun from car

Cassidy Rogers
Age: 22
Franklin, TN

Wednesday night, two people were arrested in Franklin after firing a water pellet gun from their car at a couple of strangers outside a Murfreesboro Road gas station, at 9:45 pm. Some tense moments followed after the victims reported seeing someone in a black SUV holding a rifle and someone in that vehicle saying, “go, go, go,” before hearing a loud pop that the couple believed to be a gunshot.

Officers converged on the area, quickly spotting and stopping the suspect vehicle. Inside, they found a water pellet gun used to shoot “orbeez,” a pair of brass knuckles, open alcohol, and drug contraband.

Jaden Bak
Age: 19
Franklin, TN

Jaden Bak, 19, and 22-year-old Cassidy Rogers were both arrested and charged with Assault and Disorderly Conduct. Rogers is facing an additional charge of Possession of a Prohibited Weapon, for the brass knuckles. Bak is facing additional charges, including Underage Consumption of Alcohol, Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, and Underage Possession of Vape Cartridges. Both are free on a $1,000 bond set by the Williamson County Magistrate. The couple is due in court on July 14.

Police responded to an earlier call, in downtown Franklin, where a 10-year-old girl and her mom were hit by similar projectiles shot from a passing car.

Franklin Police say they will not tolerate assaults like these on innocent and unsuspecting community members, and that arresting & charging offenders will be their prescriptive response.

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22-1816

Register: Franklin PD, May 31 Stay Safe Seminar

 

The Franklin Police Department has scheduled a free 1.5 hour seminar designed to help keep community members safe during an active shooter situation.

Because community preparedness can help save lives, Franklin Police want to share information on three main, national best practices:
Avoid, Deny, Defend.

The seminar is free and open to the public
-pre-registration is required-

Presentation2WHEN
Tuesday, May 31
10-11:30 am
WHERE
FPD Headquarters | 900 Columbia Avenue

WHO SHOULD ATTEND
Parents, teens, employers, school & church leaders, any community member.

click-here-to-register-button

Media wishing to attend or interview Franklin Police staff, instructors, or attendees need to make prior arrangements with Franklin Police Public Affairs, Lt. Charles Warner.

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Happy St. Patrick’s Day from the FPD; Increased DUI patrols have been planned to help keep Franklin safe

Extra Franklin Police Officers are hitting the streets to help keep citizens safe this St. Patrick’s Day holiday.

Officers are working overtime today to combat impaired driving, so if you plan on doing a little celebrating, you’ll want to be sure your plans include a designated driver.

Booze It & Lose It
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Impaired driver arrested for 5th DUI

Dylan Lankford
Age: 30
Mount Juliet, TN

Dylan Lankford, 30, of Mount Juliet remains jailed on a $22,000 bond after his fifth DUI arrest, last night.

An officer on patrol saw Lankford commit a traffic offense at 10:00, Monday night, at Carothers and Liberty. During the stop, the officer determined that Lankford was impaired and placed him under arrest. Thirty-five empty cans and bottles of beer were found in Lankford’s car.

Charged with Felony DUI (5th Offense), Violation of the Implied Consent Law, having open alcohol in his vehicle, and Disregarding a Traffic Control Device, Lankford is due in court on April 28.

Every day, almost 30 people in the U.S. die in drunk-driving crashes.
DUI crashes claim more than 10,000 lives per year (www.nhtsa.gov).
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Alert citizen helps land burglar behind bars

Kevonte Williams
Age: 20
Columbia, Tennessee

An auto burglar is behind bars, and Franklin Police are crediting an alert citizen. Franklin Police officers flooded the area, Monday morning, after a call came in at 3:10 am from a citizen who reported that a group of men in hoodies, wearing latex gloves, were checking car door handles in the parking lot of a Reliance Drive apartment complex.

Multiple suspects fled on foot after being challenged by officers. 20-year-old Kevonte Williams was captured during his attempted escape, and arrested. Officers found stolen property on Williams at the time of his arrest. Other arrests are expected in this case.

A citizen made all the difference in this outcome, and the Department is thankful for their attentive eye and quick call. It should be noted that the only cars entered had been left unlocked by the owners. Franklin Police want to remind citizens of the importance of locking their car doors at night, and never leaving valuables inside – especially guns.

Charged with x3 counts of Burglary and one count of Evading, Williams remains jailed on the $35,000 bond set by the Magistrate. He is due in court on March 1.

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Tips on avoiding tax season scams, from our friends at Age Well Middle Tennessee

 

As a new tax season ramps up, keep in mind that scammers will be ramping up their efforts to steal YOUR money. The scams come in different forms: phishing emails, harassing phone calls, and tax return identity theft.

Here are some steps to help keep your identity and money safe:

  • File taxes early to avoid scammers
  • Be cautious about tax-related emails. Do not use links within the email.  Instead, go to the IRS website for relevant information
  • Hang up on IRS impersonator phone calls
  • Report suspicious emails or phone calls ASAP
  • Shred bank and tax documents before throwing them away
  • Update your computer security software

The IRS offers an option called Identity Protection PIN (IP PIN) that assigns a unique six-digit code to eligible taxpayers that helps limit fraudulent tax returns. There is more information available at www.irs.gov/identity-theft-fraud-scams/get-an-identity-protection-pin.

Here are some reminders about the IRS. They will NEVER:

  • call about past taxes without having mailed several notices first
  • call to demand payment with threats to involve law enforcement and have you arrested
  • call or email asking you to divulge personal and/or financial information
  • require payment without allowing you to appeal or even question the amount due
  • require you to use a specific payment method like a pre-paid debit card
  • ask for your credit/debit card and/or bank information over the phone

If you receive any IRS-related scam communication, please report to Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA) at www.treasury.gov/tigta/ and to the IRS at phishing@irs.gov.

(Information courtesy Council on Aging)

Register: Franklin PD, February 23 Stay Safe Seminar

(Video shows previous, pre-pandemic classes. Class sizes now limited & socially distanced)

The Franklin Police Department has scheduled a free 1.5 hour seminar designed to help keep citizens safe during an active shooter situation.

Because community preparedness can help save lives, Franklin Police want to share information on three main, national best practices:
Avoid, Deny, Defend.

The seminars are free and open to the public
-pre-registration is required-
Class size is limited

Presentation2WHEN
Wednesday, February 23
10-11:30 am
WHERE
FPD Headquarters | 900 Columbia Avenue

WHO SHOULD ATTEND
Franklin parents, teens, employers, school and church leaders,
any member of the Franklin community.

click-here-to-register-button

No cameras or recording devices will be allowed into the seminar. Media wishing to interview Franklin Police staff, instructors, or attendees need to make prior arrangements with Franklin Police Public Affairs, Lt. Charles Warner.

# # #

Franklin Police offer two active shooter emergency response seminars for citizens

(Video shows previous, pre-pandemic classes. Class sizes now limited & socially distanced)

UPDATE: Seminars full — more date/time options will be announced at http://www.FranklinPDnews.com soon. 

The Franklin Police Department has scheduled two, free 1.5 hour seminars designed to help keep citizens safe during the unthinkable.

Because community preparedness can help save lives, Franklin Police want to share information on three main, national best practices:
Avoid, Deny, Defend.

The seminars are free and open to the public
-pre-registration is required-
Class size for each offering is limited to 20

Presentation2WHEN
Wednesday, February 9
10-11:30 am
or
Thursday, February 10
6-7:30 pm

WHERE
FPD Headquarters | 900 Columbia Avenue

WHO SHOULD ATTEND
Franklin parents, teens, employers, school and church leaders,
any member of the Franklin community.

click-here-to-register-button
or go to http://www.franklintn.gov/seminar

 

No cameras or recording devices will be allowed into the seminar. Media wishing to interview Franklin Police staff, instructors, or attendees need to make prior arrangements with Franklin Police Public Affairs, Lt. Charles Warner.

# # #

Tips on avoiding tech support schemes, from our friends at Age Well Middle Tennessee

According to the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3), tech support schemes are on the rise and 66% of all reports from 2020 were from older adults 60+. In this instance, criminals may pose as a company’s representatives offering to help with issues regarding your bank account, email, or computer software.

The FBI reports that the first contact can occur in many different ways.

  • Telephone: You receive an unsolicited telephone call from a criminal impersonating computer support, bank representatives/support, and utility companies.
  • Search Engine Advertising: Don’t search online to find support numbers, visit the company’s direct website. Criminals pay to have their fraudulent company’s link show higher in search results hoping victims will choose one of the top links in search results.
  • Pop-up message: When an on-screen pop-up message claiming a virus was found on their computer. The message requests the victim call a phone number associated with the fraudulent tech support company.
  • Email: You receive an email warning of support subscription expiration or a potentially fraudulent charge on their account. The victim is encouraged to contact the fraudulent support via phone.

Tips to Protect Against Tech Support

  • Legitimate customer, security, or tech support companies will not initiate unsolicited contact with individuals; nor, demand immediate payment, or require payment via prepaid cards, wire transfers, or mailed cash.
  • Install ad-blocking software that eliminates or reduces pop-ups and mal-vertising, which are online ads that incorporate or install malware. Ensure all computer anti-virus, security, and malware protection is up to date.
  • Be cautious of customer support numbers obtained via open-source searching. Phone numbers listed in a “sponsored” results section might be boosted because of Search Engine Advertising.
  • Resist the pressure to act quickly. Criminals will urge the victim to act fast to protect their device. Legitimate companies will allow time for a person to process and research any questions.
  • Never give unknown, unverified persons remote access to devices or accounts.

(Information courtesy Council on Aging)

Avoid Holiday Shopping Scams

This year, many are relying on the convenience of online shopping. Unfortunately, many will also fall victim to unscrupulous people and website scams.

These tips from the IC3 can help you look out for scammers during the Christmas season or any other time of year:

  1. Always get a tracking number for items purchased online so you can make sure they have been shipped and can follow the delivery process.
  2. Be wary of sellers who post an auction or advertisement as if they reside in the U.S., then respond to questions by stating they are out of the country on business, family emergency, or similar reasons.
  3. Avoid sellers who post an auction or advertisement under one name but ask that payment be sent to someone else.
  4. Consider canceling your purchase if a seller requests funds to be paid via a money transfer, pre-paid card, bank-to-bank wire transfer, or gift card. Money sent in these ways is virtually impossible to recover, with no recourse for the victim. Most who ask for one of these forms of payment are perpetrating a scam. A credit card is generally the safest way for consumers to pay for an online purchase.
  5. Avoid sellers who act as authorized dealers or factory representatives of popular items in countries where there would be no such dealers.
  6. Verify the legitimacy of a seller before moving forward with a purchase. If you’re using an online marketplace or auction website, check their feedback rating. Be wary of sellers with mostly unfavorable feedback ratings or no ratings at all.
  7. Always be wary of deals that seem too good to be true.

If you believe you are the victim of an online scam, please report it to your local law enforcement, credit card company/banking institution, and FBI’s IC3.

(Information courtesy Council on Aging)